RICHARD ADAMS, AUTHOR OF THE PROTO-ALT-RIGHT CLASSIC "WATERSHIP DOWN" DIES AT THE GRAND OLD AGE OF 96

"Watership Down: proto-Alt-Right classic

Richard Adams, mainly famous as the author of "Watership Down" (1972), a tale of the struggle of a group of rabbits battling for survival, has died at the grand old age of 96.

While most interpretations see "Watership Down" as merely a creepy kids story with a nice soundtrack, a correct reading of the book - and the equally famous 1978 film - reveal it to be a proto-Alt-Right classic, with themes of group struggle and survival, aided by myth, self-sacrifice, and identity. 

Adams
Realizing that their existing community is doomed by its complacency and inability to face looming existential threats, the group of protagonists band together and set out on their own in an epic journey to achieve the preconditions of collective survival, namely a secure environment, a strong sense of collective identity, and a healthy breeding population. "Watership Down" is Alt-Right metapolitics of the highest order.

Adams lived a long and interesting life, joining the British Army in 1940 and serving in Palestine, Europe, and the Far East. He then worked for the Civil Service, before becoming a full-time writer at the age of 54, following the success of "Watership Down," which grew out of stories he told his two daughters. 

The beauty of Adam's work was that its proto-Alt-Right and anti-Leftist themes were so well cloaked in the tale of a few furry rodents that even leftist critics were tricked into hailing the book's themes. 

Rest in peace, Richard Adams, who was Alt-Right even before there was an Alt-Right.



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