KOREA'S "ABRAHAM LINCOLN" THREE YEARS AWAY FROM HITTING U.S. MAINLAND

Kim Jong-un is not so different from Abraham Lincoln.
Americans may not see it this way, but Kim Jong-un is simply Korea's own Abraham Lincoln, a resolute leader determined to reunite a country split along a North-South axis. 

In fact, it could be claimed that Kim has an even greater right to do this, as the people in North and South Korea have much more in common than those divided by America's North-vs.-South division.

Also, just like Lincoln, Kim has to counter the military threat to achieve his goals. In his case that means dealing with the military threat from the USA. As America is a superpower, the only possible way for Kim to do this is to develop an effective nuclear deterrent. 

Latest news reports suggest that Kim has made great strides in improving North Korea's military capability. As reported in the British Daily Telegraph:
The ballistic missile launched by North Korea on May 14 successfully re-entered the Earth's atmosphere, according to analysts...North Korea claimed that the weapon reached an altitude of 2,111.5 km (1,312 miles) and travelled a distance of 489 miles before breaching Japan's Air Defence Identification Zone and splashing down in the Sea of Japan."

This rocket is thought to be capable of carrying a nuclear device, and experts estimate that it will now take around three years for North Korean rocket scientists to apply this latest technological breakthrough to an intercontinental missile capable of striking the mainland US. 

Of course, America could easily destroy a small country like North Korea with its massive nuclear arsenal, but the country's ability to threaten the USA and its allies with nuclear retaliation greatly raises the stakes of any American involvement in the internal affairs of the Korean peninsula. 

The ability of a country like North Korea to effectively stand up to the USA in this way sounds the death knell for the Western system of globalist imperialism. America's future is one of gradually retreating from its over-extended post-Cold War posture.

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